Top 200 Tools for Learning

Here are the 2016 Top 200 Tools for Learning list compiled by Jane Hart of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies. How are all these tools being used for learning? Take a look at the Best of Breed 2016 list where I categorise the different tools, or the 3 sub-lists Top 100 Tools for Personal Learning 2016, Top 100 Tools for Workplace Learning 2016 and the Top 100 Tools for Education 2016  To get an overview of how the tools in these 3 Top 100 lists fit into the Top 200 list, see the Comparison View. Analysis of this year’s list appears beneath the list.

  1.  YouTube
  2.  Google Search
  3. Twitter
  4. PowerPoint
  5. Google Docs/Drive
  6. Facebook
  7. Skype
  8. LinkedIn
  9. WordPress
  10. Dropbox
  11. Wikipedia
  12. Yammer
  13. WhatsApp
  14. Prezi
  15. Kahoot
  16. Word
  17. Evernote
  18. Slideshare
  19. OneNote
  20. Slack
  21. TED Talks/Ed
  22. Powtoon
  23. Feedly
  24. Camtasia
  25. Articulate
  26. Snagit
  27. Moodle
  28. Audacity
  29. Pinterest
  30. Coursera
  31. Screencast-O-matic
  32. Gmail
  33. Google Chrome
  34. Google Forms
  35. Padlet
  36. WebEx
  37. Lynda
  38. SharePoint
  39. Adobe Captivate
  40. Google Apps
  41. Google Hangouts
  42. Office Mix
  43. Trello
  44. iSpring
  45. Google Plus
  46. Excel
  47. Pocket
  48. Adobe Photoshop
  49. Google Maps
  50. Outlook
  1. EasyGenerator
  2. Khan Academy
  3. Quizlet
  4. Diigo
  5. Socrative
  6. Blogger
  7. Canva
  8. iPad & Apps
  9. Sway
  10. Google Scholar
  11. Udutu
  12. Adobe Connect
  13. iTunes & iTunesU
  14. Keynote
  15. Firefox
  16. Zoom
  17. Canvas
  18. Poll Everywhere
  19. iMovie
  20. SurveyMonkey
  21. iPhone & Apps
  22. Scoopit
  23. Udemy
  24. Duolingo
  25. Vimeo
  26. Instagram
  27. Movie Maker
  28. VideoScribe
  29. Kindle & App
  30. Google Classroom
  31. EdPuzzle
  32. TweetDeck
  33. Lectora
  34. edX
  35. Piktochart
  36. Edmodo
  37. Adobe Acrobat Pro
  38. Weebly
  39. GoAnimate
  40. ThingLink
  41. Flipboard
  42. Clarify
  43. Google Translate
  44. TodaysMeet
  45. Explain Everything
  46. Google Sites
  47. Teamviewer
  48. SoundCloud
  49. Blackboard
  50. Mahara
  1. Pixabay
  2. Confluence
  3. OneDrive
  4. MindManager
  5. FutureLearn
  6. XMind
  7. Adobe Illustrator
  8. Desire2Learn (D2L)
  9. Jing
  10. Nearpod
  11. Wordle
  12. Wix
  13. Branchtrack
  14. eXe
  15. Animoto
  16. Adobe Premiere
  17. LibreOffice
  18. FreeMind
  19. GoToMeeting
  20. Adapt
  21. Adobe AfterEffects
  22. Mentimeter
  23. Blackboard Collaborate
  24. Tumblr
  25. Adobe Audition
  26. Turnitin
  27. Adobe Animate
  28. Grammarly
  29. Adobe InDesign
  30. Pixton
  31. Sakai
  32. Buffer
  33. Totara
  34. Google Calendar
  35. Elucidat
  36. Pearltrees
  37. Haiku Deck
  38. Appear.In
  39. Degreed
  40. eLearning Brothers
  41. Scrivener
  42. CourseLab
  43. Audible
  44. Apple Watch
  45. Pages
  46. BigBlueButton
  47. Medium
  48. Cornerstone
  49. Adobe Dreamweaver
  50. Schoology
  1. Notability
  2. Delicious
  3. aNewSpring
  4. Bing
  5. Kaltura
  6. Moovly
  7. Explaindio
  8. Zeetings
  9. ILIAS
  10. Remind
  11. WeVideo
  12. Showbie
  13. PlayPosit
  14. Codecademy
  15. Periscope
  16. Vrideo
  17. Claro
  18. Inoreader
  19. Snapchat
  20. Join.Me
  21. MindMeister
  22. Axonify
  23. HipChat
  24. RoboForm
  25. Pocket Casts
  26. Franz
  27. Curatr
  28. OwnCloud
  29. Construct 2
  30. Omnigraffle
  31. Doceri
  32. Flickr
  33. Overcast
  34. Elevate
  35. emaze
  36. Reflector
  37. Thunderbird
  38. iBooks Author
  39. YouVisit
  40. Lucidchart
  41. GIMP
  42. Flipbuilder
  43. VoiceThread
  44. Presenter Media
  45. Inkscape
  46. Pathbrite
  47. PaintShop Pro
  48. Wolfram Alpha
  49. Unsplash
  50. ClassCall

Analysis

Although the 1st Top 100 Tools list in 2007 was hailed as “cutting edge”, this 10th list (together with the sub-lists) offers a better indication of the state of play of the use of tools for learning – i.e. a mix of both tradition and innovation.  This year’s big news is that Twitter loses its No 1 place on the list after 7 years, but the Top 200 list contains a huge variety of tools – with many more new tools being included this year. Here are this year’s Movers and Shakers.

Take a look at the 3 different sub-lists (for Personal Learning, for Workplace Learning and for Education)  for deeper observations but in summary …

  • Individuals continue to reap the benefits of the opportunities offered to them on the Web to learn in all kinds of ways – both planned and unplanned, formal and informal, through content and people, online or on smart devices.
  • Education is also making use of a wide range of multi-purpose web-based tools – probably because they are free and easy to use – alongside dedicated educational tools.
  • Workplace learning, however, is still largely dominated by the use of traditional commercial tools for creating, delivering and managing e-learning. However, there is increasing use of new-style content development tools and greater use is being made of tools for social collaboration (and social learning) within work teams and groups.