Top 100 Tools for Personal Learning

Generated from the Top 200 Tools for Learning, these are the tools selected by contributors as valuable for their own personal and professional learning.  Click on the tool name for more information about how it is being used. The number in brackets shows each tool’s place on the Top 200 list. Some observations beneath the list.  [Looking for some Quick Guides to these tools, visit the Modern Professional Learning Resource Centre]

  1. Google Search (2)
  2. YouTube (1)
  3. Twitter (3)
  4. Facebook (6)
  5. LinkedIn  (8)
  6. WordPress (9)
  7. Skype (7)
  8. Wikipedia (11)
  9. Google Docs/Drive (5)
  10. PowerPoint (4)
  11. WhatsApp (13)
  12. Dropbox (10)
  13. Evernote (17)
  14. Slideshare (18)
  15. Word (16)
  16. OneNote (19)
  17. TED Talks (21)
  18. Feedly (23)
  19. Pinterest (29)
  20. Yammer (12)
  21. Slack (20)
  22. Coursera (30)
  23. Gmail (32)
  24. Google Chrome (33)
  25. Lynda (37)
  1. Prezi (14)
  2. Google Plus (45)
  3. Pocket (47)
  4. Google Maps (49)
  5. Diigo (54)
  6. Blogger (56)
  7. Google Scholar (60)
  8. iTUnes & iTunesU (63)
  9. Excel (46)
  10. Keynote (64)
  11. Firefox (65)
  12. iMovie (69)
  13. Outlook (50)
  14. iPhone & Apps (71)
  15. Scoop.it (72)
  16. Udemy (73)
  17. duolingo (74)
  18. Instagram (76)
  19. iPad & Apps (58)
  20. Kindle (79)
  21. Tweetdeck (82)
  22. edX (84)
  23. Flipboard (91)
  24. Google Translate (93)
  25. Screencast-O-matic (31)
  1. Canva (57)
  2. Quizlet (53)
  3. Audacity (28)
  4. Google Apps (40)
  5. Google Hangouts (41)
  6. Khan Academy (52)
  7. Trello (43)
  8. Snagit (26)
  9. Vimeo (75)
  10. SurveyMonkey (70)
  11. TeamViewer (97)
  12. SoundCloud (98)
  13. Pixabay (101)
  14. OneDrive (103)
  15. Mindmanager (104)
  16. FutureLearn (105)
  17. Xmind (106)
  18. Mahara (100)
  19. Wordle (111)
  20. LibreOffice (117)
  21. Freemind (118)
  22. Tumblr (124)
  23. Buffer (132)
  24. Google Calendar (134)
  25. Google Forms (34)
  1. Pearltrees (136)
  2. Haiku Deck (137)
  3. Appear.In (138)
  4. Degreed (139)
  5. Scrivener (141)
  6. Audible (143)
  7. Apple Watch (144)
  8. Pages (145)
  9. Zoom (66)
  10. Medium (147)
  11. Weebly (88)
  12. Delicious (152)
  13. Google Sites (96)
  14. Bing (154)
  15. Codecademy (164)
  16. Periscope (165)
  17. Vrideo (166)
  18. Inoreader (168)
  19. Snapchat (169)
  20. Mindmeister (171)
  21. RoboForm (174)
  22. Pocket Casts (175)
  23. Franz (176)
  24. Omnigraffle (180)
  25. Flickr (182)

Observations

Individuals are using these tools to learn in a wide variety of ways  – both planned and unplanned, formal and informal, through content and people, online or on smart devices.

  • to search and research on the Web (Google, Wikipedia, Google Scholar, Bing)
  • to learn from online courses (Coursera, Lynda, Udemy, FutureLearn, edX, Codecademy, duolingo, Degreed)
  • to learn from online  resources, e.g. videos (YouTube, TED Talks, Vimeo), presentations (Slideshare) and podcasts (SoundCloud, Audible, PocketCasts)
  • to learn from others in both social and professional networks (Twitter (and Tweetdeck), Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and SnapChat) as well as messaging apps to communicate with groups (WhatsApp, Slack, Franz)
  • to aggregate, curate and share news (Feedly, Diigo, Flipboard, Scoopit, Pearltrees)
  • to create documents (Word, Google Docs, Scrivener, Pages) and presentations (PowerPoint, Prezi, Haiku Deckr)
  • to mindmap (MindManager, Xmind, Freemind, Mindmeister)
  • to blog (WordPress, Blogger, Tumblr, Medium)
  • to send and receive emails (Gmail, Outlook)
  • to store and synch their files online (Google Dirive, OneDrive and ownCloud)
  • for personal productivity (Pocket, Google Calendar, Roboform, Google Maps,

They make use of a variety of smart devices and apps (iPhone, iPad, Kindle, Apple Watch)

Clear there is a lot of experimentation with tools for personal learning before it is brought into workplace or education.